Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Jill Krementz covers Cornelia Parker on the Met roof

Artist Cornelia Parker.
Roof Garden Commission at the Met
Cornelia Parker, Transitional Object (Psycho Barn)
April 19-October 31, 2016
The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Still showing the house from Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho," 1960.
Edward Hopper's "House by the Railroad," 1925. These houses inspired Cornelia Parker's installation: "Psycho Barn"
Cornelia Parker, the acclaimed British artist, has been selected for this year's site-specific commissioned work.

Parker's architectural structure is inspired by two icons of American architecture — the classic red barn featured in Edward Hopper's paintings and the Bates family's sinister mansion from Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film, "Psycho."

The large-scale sculpture, nearly 30 feet high, is fabricated from a deconstructed red barn and seems at first to be a genuine house; but it isn't. It's a scaled-down structure consisting of two facades propped up from behind with scaffolding.

The commission was conceived by Sheena Wagstaff and curated by Beatrice Galilee, in consultation with the artist. A small catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

There was an opening night party honoring the artist hosted by Tom Campbell.

Among the guests: artists Julian Schnabel and Alex Katz; architect Sir Norman Foster, and trustee Mercedes Bass.
Psycho Barn by Cornelia Parker on rooftop of Met — two views.
Samantha Boardman, a Met trustee, with the Met's Tom Campbell. Ms. Boardman was wearing a jacket by Balmain and a dress by her favorite designer, Miu Miu.
Mercedes Bass and Luke Syson, Curator in Charge of the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Met.
Thelma Golden, the Director and Chief Curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem. Artist Alex Katz and Cornelia Parker.
Julian Schnabel and Sheena Wagstaff. That's the artist Cornelia Parker behind Julian's shoulder.












The back of Julian Schnabel's jacket with logo of the Blind Girl Surf Club, which Julian started with Herbie Fletcher in Hawaii.
Cornelia Parker with her 14-year-old daughter Lily.
English architect Sir Norman Foster with his wife Elena.
Julian Schnabel in front of installation.
Emma Eastwood-Paticchio (who works in the NY Attorney General's office) and Isabel Shill (an actress and friend of Cornelia's).
Alex and Ava Katz. Alex will have an exhibit starting June 1st in London at the Serpentine Gallery. Beatrice Galilee, who curated the show. Her dress is Balenciaga; her shoes Manolos. When complimented on how gorgeous she looked ... she replied, "I'm usually just slopping around looking like a mess."
Eva Franch Gilabert, Executive Director & Chief Curator of Storefront for Art and Architecture, with her associate Jinny Khanduja. Writer Christopher Mason.
Models Amiraa Vee and Marcel Lash.
The Met's Mike Hearn, Chairman, Department of Asian Art. Maggie Schade (sister-in-law of Cornelia Parker) with her six-month-old son Pax. Ms. Schade is a member of the staff of Christ Church in Oregon, Missouri.
Art critic Jason Kaufman with his sweetie Jan Rothchild, who is with Brunswick Group. John Dobkin, former director of the National Academy of Design and President of Historic Hudson Valley.
Edith and Philippe de Montebello, Julian Schnabel, and Jennifer Russell, who will be the Met's Assistant Director "for another week."
Artists Nick Theobald and his wife Josephine Meckseper. Theobald shows at Annarumma Gallery, Meckseper at Andrea Rosen.
Madlin Sadler and sculptor Ana Prada. Architect Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss, who designs exhibitions for galleries and events.
Mark Francis and his wife Sheena Wagstaff.
Beatrice Pei, Diane Fisher, and Béatrice Helg. Ms. Pei and Ms. Fisher are real estate partners of Terrace and Garden Properties. Ms. Helg is a photographer. Jason Amis, founder of The Yogi Bhakti Project, with Carrie Barratt, Tom Campbell's deputy director.
At the end of the evening, a very happy artist, Cornelia Parker, with her husband Jeff McMillan. Mr. McMillan is a painter and a curator.

Text and photographs © by Jill Krementz: all rights reserved. Contact Jill Krementz here.