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Jill Krementz visits Stieglitz and His Artists

Portrait of Alfred Stieglitz at his Gallery: 291
Photograph (1915) by his close friend, Edward Steichen
Gum bichromate over platinum print

In 1916, Stieglitz wrote to a friend: To me, as I walk through the Metropolitan Museum of Art it seems ridiculous to me. The whole thing. A sham. Trivial. Absolutely superfluous. But I know that that is a reflection of my own state of mind. That I find nothing in the Metropolitan Museum of Art that I need. That means anything to me. I know that I need bigger, truer, things than are housed together there, in an atmosphere which repels me. An atmosphere breathing of a cemetery dedicated to the dead rich.
Stieglitz and His Artists: Matisse to O’Keeffe
October 13, 2011—January 2, 2012
The Metropolitan Museum
Tisch Galleries, 2nd floor


Alfred Stieglitz was not only a master photographer, but also a visionary art dealer and collector. Promoting modern art in America when few understood it, Stieglitz introduced striking new photography, paintings, prints, and sculptures to the public through his journal, Camera Work (1902-17), and in his “Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession” (1905-17), known simply as “291” for its address on Fifth Avenue.

Stieglitz was also his own gallery’s best client, supporting the artists he most admired by purchasing their work and thus building one of the most impressive collections of early 20th-century art, especially notable for including photography, which many did not yet consider a true art form. His widow, Georgia O’Keeffe, would later bequeath most of this collection to the Met, where it is currently on view.

The exhibition of 200 works, organized by Lisa Messinger, spreads out over 13 galleries. In addition to photographs by Stieglitz and Edward Steichen, a close personal friend, are paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri Matisse, Constantin Brancusi, Vasily Kandinsky, Francis Picabia, Gino Severini, Marsden Hartley, Charles Demuth, and Arthur Dove.

Accompanying the exhibition is a magnificent catalogue (360 pp; 800 illustrations, $65) edited by Ms. Messinger that includes 31 insightful essays by many of her colleagues at the museum. Once again we can all be grateful to Iris Cantor, who helped bring this project to fruition.
Entrance to the exhibition.
Met curator Lisa Messinger organized the exhibition and edited the catalogue which accompanies the show. When I asked Ms. Messinger where she would like me to photograph her, she immediately said: "In front of an O’Keeffe. She's my artist!" That is because Ms. Messinger has written a book about the woman who was a major figure in American art for seven decades.

On the wall, Georgia O’Keeffe. American, 1887–1986, Cow’s Skull: Red, White, and Blue, 1931
Oil on canvas.
Alfred Stiegliz at An American Place, ca. 1939
Photographed by Ansel Adams.
Gary Tinterow with Iris Cantor, whose foundation underwrote the exhibit.

Mr. Tinterow is one of the Met's department heads who helped shepherd the project, conceived decades ago in the 1970s.
A wall of Toulouse-Lautrecs. Many of the works exhibited at “291” between 1908 and 1913 were chosen for the express purpose of unsettling and dismaying the viewer. For example, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s prints of theater personalities and prostitutes, shown at “291” in 1909–10, satirized the dissolute glamour of Parisian nightlife.
Mary Schmidt Campbell, Dean of Tisch School of the Arts, in front of a
Toulouse-Lautrec.
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Title Page from the series Elles, 1896
Lithograph
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Cléo de Mérode, 1898
Lithograph
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
The Box with the Gilded Mask, 1893
Lithograph
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Filling a Tub, from Elles, 1896
Lithograph
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Looking in a Mirror, from Elles, 1896
Lithograph
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Combing Hair, from Elles, 1896
Lithograph
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Waking Up, from Elles, 1896
Lithograph
Crooner, and artist, Tony Bennett whom I often see at the Met. Mr. Bennett recently celebrated his 85th birthday with a sold-out concert at the other Met. Tony Bennett and his wife, Susan Benedetto.
Arthur B. Davies
Reclining Woman, 1913
Pastel on Japanese Paper
Gallery Three: Picasso and Matisse
Stieglitz introduced the work of Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso to Americans in 1908 and 1911, respectively, in one-man shows at “291.” Recognized today as giants of modern art, they were at the time completely unknown in the States. Stieglitz heartily endorsed such avant-garde shows, relying on his team of advisors—including Edward Steichen, Marius de Zayas, and Paul Haviland—to recommend the artists and choose the works. The gallery held three shows each for Matisse (1908, 1910, 1912) and Picasso (1911, 1914–15, and 1915).

Due to the gallery’s small size and the cost of shipping art overseas, these exhibitions featured mainly drawings and only a few small paintings and sculptures. The New York press and public responded negatively or with confusion, but to Stieglitz these shows were hugely successful. They not only raised the standing of “291” as the place to see contemporary art in America (especially in the years prior to the 1913 Armory Show) but they also encouraged American artists to work abstractly and to use color expressionistically.

In 1908, when Stieglitz and Steichen first talked about showing Picasso’s work, they called it “the red rag”—the “!!!” that would attract attention and provoke debate. In comparison, they considered the theater designer Gordon Craig, whose suite of prints was exhibited at “291” in 1910–11, the “understandable one.”
Pablo Picasso
Bottle and Wine Glass on a Table
1912
Charcoal, ink, cut and pasted newspaper, and graphite on paper
Henri Matisse
Female Torso
1906; cast ca. 1908
Bronze, 2/10
9 1/8 x 4 x 3 in.
Weight 5 lbs
Henri Matisse
Reclining Male Nude
ca. 1907
Graphite on paper
Henri Matisse
Seated Nude,
1908–9
Graphite on paper
Gift of Florence Blumenthal, 1910

This drawing is one of three by Matisse donated to the Metropolitan Museum in 1910 by Florence Blumenthal, wife of Museum Trustee and future Museum president George Blumenthal.

Purchased from Matisse’s second show at “291” for twenty dollars apiece, they
were offered to the Metropolitan and, as expected given the donor’s connection, accepted, thus becoming the institution’s first works by the artist. They were, in fact, also the first works by the artist to enter any American museum. As the Blumenthals were major collectors of medieval and Renaissance art, their purchase of these modernist works—
apparently, the only ones they ever made—suggests the behind-the-scenes prompting of some influential art figures: Bernard Berenson, the Renaissance art scholar and defender of Matisse’s work; Alfred Stieglitz, who later used the same tactic to introduce photography into the Metropolitan’s collection; and Eugene Meyer (brother of Florence Blumenthal), who with his wife, Agnes, was a major patron and supporter of Stieglitz and his gallery.
Henri Matisse
Nude
ca. 1908
Graphite on paper
Henri Matisse
Seated Nude
1908–9
Graphite on paper
Henri Matisse
Walking Nude
1905–6
Graphite on paper
Henri Matisse
Nude with Bracelets
1909
Ink on paper
The Met's Sabine Rewald, who curated the gallery devoted to Matisse and wrote an essay on the French artist for the catalogue. Ms. Rewald curated the Met's exquisite "Rooms With a View: The Open Window in the 19th Century," which explains the poster on her office wall.
Dana Messinger, daughter of Lisa Messinger, who curated the exhibition. Ms. Messinger, 32, works in the admissions department of Johns Hopkins.

On the wall:
Here, This Is Stieglitz Here, 1915, Ink, graphite, and cut-and-pasted painted and printed papers on paperboard.
Elisabeth Biondi, the recently retired photography editor of The New Yorker, who is now an independent curator. Christopher Mason. Mr. Mason is currently working on the second season of his hit TV show, Behind Mansion Walls, about murder in fabulous houses (on the Investigation Discovery channel). Known for his witty songs, he is also busy with commissions to write and perform funny musical toasts and roasts.

"It's a superb exhibition, brilliantly conceived. Fascinating to learn that Stieglitz introduced the work of Picasso and Matisse to New York. Who knew?"
Sheila Ramsey and her husband Tony Askin. Mr. Askin is the Met's supervising technician for 19th century, modern and contemporary art.

On the wall is Mardsen Hartley's Portrait of a German Officer.
Dr. Beverly Johnson, a rheumatologist at the Hospital for Special Surgery. "I have been a lover of art since I was five years old.
View of Gallery 4. Diamond shaped painting is by Gino Severini, Dancer=Propeller=Sea, 1915.

Gino Severini was affiliated with the Futurists, a group of Italian painters and sculptors that sought to capture the power and speed of modern technology in their art. He worked in Paris prior to World War I, where he made this painting, Dancer=Propeller=Sea. It portrays the brilliant color and swirling movements of a dancer, among other things. In his mind, there was a visual equivalent between the movement of the dancer, in this case, an airplane propeller spinning, and the rolling motion of the waves in the sea.

Severini uses a diamond-shaped canvas to enhance the sense of movement. However, according to Lisa Messinger whose voice you hear on the audio, "neither Stieglitz nor the Met realized it was a diamond shape. It was not until the artist (Severini) saw it after the Met acquired this work and said: 'Oh you know, you need to turn that around. ' And so ever since then it's been in its correct position."
Gino Severini
Dancer=Propeller=Sea
1915
Francis Picabia
The Musketeer
1924
Gouache on paper
Francis Picabia
Bird and Turtle
ca. 1925–27
Gouache, watercolor, graphite, and conté crayon on paper
Francis Picabia
The Globe
ca. 1924–27
Gouache, watercolor, graphite, and ink on paper
Christal Force, a research associate at the Met. "I worked on this show with Lisa, and in particular, on the Brancusi section. I researched the provenance on the works and wrote about Brancusi for the catalogue." Christal Force and Mary Ann Rotondi. Ms. Rotondi is a producer for Dateline, NBC. "Our little boys are
best friends."
Constantin Brancusi
French (born Romania)
Study for the Sculpture
The First Step
ca. 1913
Wax crayon on paper
Constantin Brancusi
Sleeping Muse
1910
Bronze

On the wall is a Stieglitz photograph of the Brancusi installation in his gallery.
Reverse: Constantin Brancusi
Sleeping Muse
1910
Bronze
Gallery Five: Marius de Zayas
The Mexican caricaturist Marius de Zayas (1880–1961), whose witty parodies of entertainers, socialites, and politicians appeared in the press, joined Stieglitz in the attempt to bring modern art to America. De Zayas’s charcoal drawings, which could veer into radical abstraction, fit right in with the aesthetic of “291,” where he had three shows (1909, 1910, 1913). De Zayas’s contacts in France proved invaluable in obtaining loans for “291” and authors for Camera Work. He wrote a number of important articles and organized the gallery’s most exciting shows in 1914–15: African sculpture, Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, and Francis Picabia.

Although caricature was not one of Stieglitz’s primary interests, he valued its ability to reveal a sitter’s true self, which he compared to the “pure” and unfiltered artistic expressions of non-Western and non-traditional arts that he showed at “291.” In the forty de Zayas caricatures now in the Museum’s Stieglitz Collection, no one appears more often than Stieglitz. Their relationship faltered after 1915, when the artist (with Paul Haviland, Agnes Meyer, and Picabia) began the Modern Gallery and the periodical 291. While Stieglitz at first blessed these ventures as off-shoots of “291” and Camera Work, he ultimately saw them as competition and criticism. Within months, what had been one of the strongest alliances at “291” ended, as did de Zayas’s production of caricatures.
Marius de Zayas
recto: Pamela Colman Smith
verso: William Merritt Chase, after painting by John Singer Sargent, ca. 1910
Charcoal on paper
A view of Gallery 5 displaying the wonderfully whimsical work of Marius de Zayas.
A young woman named Natasha, who did not want to give her last name. I told her that unless she was on parole I didn't see why she was being coy, but she was not to be persuaded. Marius de Zayas
Alfred Stieglitz, L'accoucheur d'idées (The Midwife
to Ideas)
ca. 1908–9
Charcoal and graphite on paper
Detail of Alfred Stieglitz, L'accoucheur d'idées (The Midwife to Ideas)
ca. 1908–9
Charcoal and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Alfred Stieglitz
1910
Ink on paper
Marius de Zayas
Anne Brigman and Max Weber
1910
Ink, watercolor, and metallic paint on paper
Marius de Zayas
Gertrude Käsebier
1910
Ink, watercolor, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Alfred Stieglitz
1910
Ink, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Clarence White
1910
Ink, watercolor, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Dallet Fuguet
1910
Ink, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
John Marin
1910
Ink, watercolor, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Edward Steichen
1910
Ink, watercolor, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Max Weber
ca. 1910
Ink, gouache, watercolor, metallic paint, and graphite on paper
Marius de Zayas
Man in Profile (John Drew?)
ca. 1910
Ink and watercolor on paper
Gallery Six: John Marin: Early Work
John Marin (1870–1953) was a leading figure in American modernism and Stieglitz’s close friend for more than three decades. Stieglitz’s longtime support of his career included annual exhibitions, beginning with a two-man show (with the American painter Alfred H. Maurer) in 1909 and his first solo exhibition, in 1910. Marin, who had received his artistic training in New York, Philadelphia, and Paris, was initially influenced by Henri Matisse’s bold non-naturalistic color and expressive use of line, Paul Cézanne’s rethinking of solid forms in space, and the Cubists’ fracturing of planes. He soon developed his own characteristic style, with which he conveyed the underlying tensions and harmonies of the natural and the man-made worlds.

Marin’s early subjects included views from his travels in France, Italy, Holland, Belgium, and Germany in 1905–9, depicted in watercolors and prints. Although better known as a watercolorist, he had begun his career as an etcher and continued to make prints regularly until 1916–17. After returning to New York, he captured the dramatic growth that had taken place while he was away by emphasizing the angular dynamism of the city’s skyscrapers and bridges. Even in coastal Maine, where he spent most summers, the same dynamic forces informed his landscapes.
John Marin: The Saint Paul's Church series

Marin’s rise as an American modernist coincided with New York’s physical transformation into a modern city. Using abstraction and Cubo-Futurist fracturing of forms to convey the city’s energy, Marin adopted several architectural landmarks (including Saint Paul’s Church and the Brooklyn Bridge) as his signature subjects.

In 1913 he produced a series of etchings of the newly constructed Woolworth Building, located on Broadway across from City Hall. At sixty stories, the Woolworth Building—known as the “Cathedral of Commerce”—was then the world’s tallest structure. Marin captured its imposing height in his distinctive visual vocabulary: the skyscraper seems to sway and almost dance, surging above the older, lower architecture of Manhattan’s financial district.
John Marin
Woolworth Building, No. 2
1913
Etching
John Marin
Woolworth Building (The Dance)
1913
Etching
John Marin
In London Town
1908
Watercolor and charcoal on paper
John Marin
Movement, The Seine, Paris
1909
Watercolor on paper
John Marin
Saint Paul's, Manhattan
1914
Watercolor and charcoal on paper
John Marin
Brooklyn Bridge
ca. 1912
Watercolor and charcoal on paper
John Marin
Brooklyn Bridge, No. 6 (Swaying)
1913
Etching
John Marin
Brooklyn Bridge (Oblong)
1911
Etching with graphite
Larry Giacoletti and Mary Schmidt Campbell. Mr. Giacoletti is a printmaker who works at The Noguchi Museum in Long Island City. "I studied etching and still do them." Dr. Campbell is coming up on her 20th anniversary at the Tisch School of the Arts and there will be a big celebration on April 19th.
Gallery 8: Abraham Walkowitz
Abraham Walkowitz (1878–1965) met Stieglitz through Marsden Hartley in 1912, and a close friendship developed that lasted until “291” closed in 1917. Walkowitz worked as Stieglitz’s gallery assistant, and Stieglitz championed his art by giving him five exhibitions.

Walkowitz’s output was rarely as innovative or as artistically refined as that of his colleagues at “291.” During their association, however, Stieglitz considered him a genuine modernist whose simplified, almost rudimentary style was evidence of artistic purity. Like several artists in the Stieglitz circle,Walkowitz preferred the medium of watercolor on paper.

Walkowitz was inspired by the avant garde masters Matisse, Picasso, Cézanne, and Kandinsky and the self-taught “naïve” painter Henri Rousseau. In 1912 he organized one of the most unusual shows at “291”—a display of children’s drawings, which Stieglitz heartily endorsed.
One of his favorite subjects was the dancer Isadora Duncan, who was a symbol of artistic freedom and a muse for many artists of the day. Walkowitz also produced a number of pastoral landscapes with large groups of people. Most important as far as his status as a modernist are the abstract compositions he created with organic shapes and rhythmic lines that merely evoke nature and human figures.
Abraham Walkowitz
Isadora Duncan
ca. 1911-13
Ink and graphite on paper
There is a total of seven Walkowitzes of Isadora Duncan on display.
Gaston Lachaise
Standing Nude
ca. 1915-17, cast ca. 1925-27
Nickel-plated bronze
Abraham Walkowitz
Symphony in Creation in Eight Movements
ca. 1914-16
Wax crayon and pastel on eight sheets of paper, with one cut-and-pasted strip, mounted on paper
Gallery 7: Reading Room
Camera Work (published and edited by Alfred Stieglitz, 1903–17) started as the “mouthpiece” for the new Photo-Secessionist group. Edward Steichen designed its cover and page typography, and “291” associates contributed articles and photographs. Later, when Stieglitz’s gallery focus shifted to modern art, the contents of Camera Work shifted, too. By 1917 it had featured such important artists and writers as Picasso, Matisse, Rodin, Kandinsky, and Gertrude Stein.
In a display case:
291, nos. 5-6 (July-August 1915)
Cover designed by Francis Picabia
On the wall in the Reading Room:
Picnic at Seven Springs, Mt. Kisco, N.Y.
ca. 1912-14, Unknown Photographer

Left to right: Paul Haviland, Abraham Walkowitz, Katharine N. Rhoades, Emmeline Stieglitz, Agnes Ernst Meyer, Alfred Stieglitz, J. B. Kerfoot, and John Marin.
In the Reading Room.
Stieglitz and O'Keeffe at Lake George
ca. 1932
Unknown photographer
Rachel Mustalish, a Met Conservator. Ms. Mustalish wrote the technical notes for the catalogue.
Rachel Mustalish with her family: Dr. Anthony Mustalish, her brother David Mustalish and her mother, Dr. Elayne Mustalish, a retired pediatrician.
Catalogue accompanying the exhibition
On the cover:
Charles Demuth
I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold
1928
Oil, graphite, ink, and gold leaf on paperboard (Upson board)
Pages 202-203 of the catalogue showing paintings by Georgia O'Keeffe accompanied by text written by Lisa Messinger.
Photograph of Alfred Stieglitz by Dorothy Norman, ca. 1930.
Gallery 9
Marsden Hartley
Portrait of a German Officer, 1914
Oil on canvas

This painting is thought to be the first and largest in a series of fourteen pictures executed in Berlin between November 1914 and December 1915. Painted as a memorial tribute to his friend and possible lover Lieutenant Karl von Freyburg, a cavalry officer in Kaiser Wilhelm’s army who was killed in battle, it includes details about the soldier’s life and service: his initials, age (24), regiment (E for Bavarian Eisenbahn), Bavarian flag (blue and white lozenges), imperial German flag (black, white, red), and Iron Cross, along with other more generic military regalia. Although it is not a literal portrait, its verticality and size (5 feet 8 inches) suggest a standing figure. Other canvases in the series are smaller, squarer, and more generally reference the military, rather than von Freyburg specifically. When Hartley returned by ship to New York in advance of his 1916 show at “291,” it was the only painting he carried with him (the others were shipped separately), attesting to its personal significance.
Marsden Hartley
Banquet in Silence, 1935–36
Oil on canvas board
Marsden Hartley
The Virgin of Guadalupe
ca. 1918-19
Oil and charcoal on paperboard
Marsden Hartley
Cemetery, New Mexico
1924
Oil on canvas
Gallery 10
Arthur Dove
American, 1880–1946
Goat, 1935
Oil on canvas, with selective varnish

From 1933 to 1938 Dove managed an inherited property in Geneva, New York, that included a farm. There, he was frequently in contact with barnyard animals, which he portrayed in works ranging from naturalistic to abstract, sometimes at a distance and sometimes close up. In Goat and its smaller preparatory watercolor study (on view nearby), the animal visually merges with its environment. Depicted in the tones of soil, foliage, water, and sky, the goat is not only part of the landscape but also seems transformed into a landscape.

Dove’s creative process always involved preliminary studies, which he called “small ones,” that were transferred to larger paintings with the aid of a pantograph machine or a slide projector. In this instance he planned almost every detail since there are very few differences between the two versions. Even the thinned oil paint washes emulate the translucency of the watercolor.
Arthur Dove
Shore Road
1942
Wax emulsion on canvas
Gallery 12
Between 1923 and 1929 Demuth painted eight “poster portraits” and made notes for three more that symbolically represented American artists, writers, and stage performers whom he knew. While the others are static still-life arrangements, this one depicts a dynamic city scene in the artist’s Precisionist style.

Based on a poem by his friend William Carlos Williams, it uses diagonal lines and intersecting rays to evoke the movement of a fire engine on a rainy New York City street. Correspondence between Demuth and Williams (about April–May 1929) indicates that significant color changes were made to the 5s and the fire truck, but the absence of such changes in this picture suggests that there may have been a preliminary painting—now lost or, more likely, destroyed by the artist.
Charles Demuth
I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold
1928
Oil, graphite, ink, and gold leaf on paperboard (Upson board)
The poem by William Carlos Williams.
John Marin
Motive, Telephone Building, New York
1936
Watercolor, ink, charcoal, and graphite on paper
John Marin
Related to Downtown New York, Movement No. 2 (The Black Sun)
1926
Watercolor and charcoal on paper
John Marin
Related to Downtown New York, Movement No. 1
1926
Watercolor and charcoal on paper
John Marin
Circus Horses
1936
Oil on canvas, with artist-made frame
The final gallery, Gallery 13, is devoted to Georgia O’Keeffe.
Gaston Lachaise
Georgia O’Keeffe
1925–27
Alabaster
Gary Tinterow continues his "tour" for those fortunate enough to have followed him through all the galleries at his brisk, very brisk pace.
Georgia O'Keeffe
From the Faraway, Nearby
1937
Oil on canvas
Georgia O'Keeffe
Clam Shell
1930
Oil on canvas
After 1929 O’Keeffe derived her subjects mostly from the landscape of New Mexico, where she traveled regularly before settling there permanently in 1949, three years after Stieglitz’s death. This picture, however, was likely painted at Lake George, New York, in fall 1931 from bones she had shipped east the year before.

The striped background may derive from another keepsake from New Mexico: a Navajo blanket. To O’Keeffe, the bones represented the timeless beauty of the desert and the enduring strength of the American spirit. The title and the tricolor palette of the American flag are a satirical comment on artists, writers, and musicians of the day who were obsessed with identifying an “American” style. Jokingly, O’Keeffe said that if people wanted a real American painting, she’d give it to them and “make it in red, white, and blue.”
  Georgia O'Keeffe
Cow's Skull: Red, White, and Blue
1931
Oil on canvas
Georgia O'Keeffe
Black Abstraction
1927
Oil on canvas
Georgia O'Keeffe
Grey Tree, Lake George
1925
Oil on canvas
Georgia O'Keeffe
Black Iris
1926
Oil on canvas
Bill Keller, former editor of The New York Times, and Gary Tinterow.
Georgia O'Keeffe
East River From the Shelton Hotel
Oil on canvas
Alfred Stieglitz, portrait of Georgia O'Keeffe
1931, Gelatin silver print
Lisa Messinger's book about Georgia O'Keeffe is available in the Met's gift shop as you exit the exhibition.
Curator Lisa Messinger.
When O’Keeffe sent an overture to Francis Henry Taylor on September 2, 1946 less than two months after Stieglitz’s death, she had already done a fair amount of thinking and planning:

You have undoubtedly heard of the death of Alfred Stieglitz. He has left things for me to decide that he either would not or could not decide for himself. There is his own work and a large group of paintings by the artists who particularly interested him — Marin — Demuth — Hartley — Dove and myself. Would you be interested in talking with me about this? And could we talk about it this week if you are interested. I want to get to the country next week for a couple of months. The fall is always my best working time. However I may not get away. A will seems to not want to move very fast. I also feel I must at least make the effort to start doing something about this before I go. May I hear from you.
Emma and Bill Keller in the gift shop.
On sale in the gift shop: great clocks made out of old cameras.
Brownie Clock with Flash, $200. Antique Camera Clock, $325.
Box Camera Clock, $175.
Books about Georgia O'Keeffe.
O'Keeffe memorabilia.
Marin: New York Skyline Neckerchief, $28. Kandinsky Oblong Scarf, $70.
Alfred Stieglitz: The Key Set
Sarah Greenough
2 Volume Set
Clothbound; $150

The wonderful boxed set by the legendary photography curator of the National Gallery shows off the glory of Stieglitz the photographer, which this show can only hint at.
T-shirts and posters.
Charles Demuth
Small Daffodils, ca 1914
Digital reproduction
Printed by the Photograph Studio of
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
$25 unframed
$225 framed
Charles Demuth
Narcissi, 1917
Digital reproduction
Printed by the Photograph Studio of
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
$25 unframed
$225 framed
Biography of Stieglitz by Katherine Hoffman.
Exhibition catalogues.
Lisa Messinger leaves her office after a long day.
Text and photographs © by Jill Krementz: all rights reserved.




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